The history of Powerlifting

In Hungary the powerlifting sport appeared in 1960’s and the first competition was in 1968. We had to wait two decade until the „other sport which came from West” (so the bodybuilding) found it’s way in our country and this two sport together could form a professional organization. In 16th of December 1989, the Hungarian Bodybuilding and Powerlifting Federation was formed. Only seven years later the powerlifting became really popular and gained a lots of followers which made it possible to separate it from bodybuilding and become independent! The professional leaders of the Bodybuilding and Powerlifting Federation on the yearly general meeting, before the 1996’s Sportslaw was decided, made a decision about separation (but even the Sportslaw says that they would have been separated anyway, because the international league of both sports had AGFIS membership).The Hungarian Powerlifting Federation was formed in 25th of February, 1996. Rónaszéki András has been chosen as the first president and he is still filling this position.

The powerlifting as a sport is not known as well for the biggest part of the people as we would expect that from the popularity what it gained with the time. Mostly we could compare it with the weight-lifting. Powerlifting is a strength sport that consists of three attempts at maximal weight on three lifts:

One of them, the bench press, became that much popular that they started to organize independent bench press competitions, even World- and European championships.

The powerlifting is having more than 40 years history behind, the General Association of International Sports Federations (AGFIS) acknowledge it in 1970. Since that they are regularly organizing world- and europian championships for different age-groups and in both gender. The powerlifting, unfortunately, is still not an olympic sport, because when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) made a proposal on the yearly Congress in Salzburg, Austria in 1996, about lowing the ammount of weight categories in this sport (there were 10 women and 11 men weight categories), the delegates of the member countries denied this suggestion, so we lost our chance to come up as a first performance with this sport in the australian Olympic Games.

In 2011 the IPF reduced the amount of weight categories, to 8 at women and to 9 at men.

The IOC will negotiate in 2015 with the leadership of the Internation Powerlifting Federation about the chance of being accepted to Olympic Games. As we know, until 2024 the powerlifting will be present at the biggest contest of sports.

The Hungarian Powerlifting Federation can show up really good results, it started even before the separation and independence, we always had word- and european champions which proved that our nobel place in this sport is deserved.

We differentiate two type of competiting in powerlifting: equipped and un-equipped. In the equipped version they use squat suit and bandage at squats, bench shirt at bench press and deadlift suit at deadlifts.

The other is the RAW competiting (un-equipped), where they are not using those supporting equipments what we mentioned previously. The powerlifter’s clothing is containing: bib jersey suit, shirt, wrist wraps, weight belts and special footwears (deadlift socks).

Age-groups

Men Youth: from the first day of the age 14 until the last day of the age 18

Junior: from the 1st day of that year (1st of January) when he reach the age 19, until the last day of that calendar year when he will become 23 years old

Adult: from the 1st day of the age 24, until the last day of that calendar year when he will become 39 years old

Masters I: from the 1st of January of that year when he reach the age 40, until the last day of that calendar year when he will become 49 years old

Masters II: from the 1st of January of that year when he reach the age 50, until the last day of that calendar year when he will become 59 years old

Masters III: from the 1st of January of that year when he reach the age 60, until the last day of that calendar year when he will become 69 years old

Masters IV: from the 1st of January of that year when he reach the age 70, and there is no upper age limit at this last age-group (in this group there is no weight category either).

Women

Youth: from the first day of the age 14 until the last day of the age 18

Junior: from the 1st day of that year (1st of January) when she reach the age 19, until the last day of that calendar year when she will become 23 years old

Adult: from the 1st day of the age 24, until the last day of that calendar year when she will become 39 years old

Masters I: from the 1st of January of that year when she reach the age 40, until the last day of that calendar year when she will become 49 years old

Masters II: from the 1st of January of that year when she reach the age 50, until the last day of that calendar year when she will become 59 years old

Masters III: from the 1st of January of that year when she reach the age 60, and there is no upper age limit at this last age-group (in this group there is no weight category either).

Weight categories

Men

In the Youth and Juniour category: until 53 kg

59.0 kg: until 59 kg

66.0 kg: 59.01 kg – 66.00 kg

74 kg: 66.01 kg – 74.00 kg

83.0 kg: 74.01 kg – 83.00 kg

93 kg: 83.01 kg – 93 kg

105.0 kg: 93.01 kg – 105.00 kg

120.0 kg: 105.01 kg – 120.00 kg

+120.0 kg: over 120.01 kg

Women

In the Youth and Junior category: until 43 kg 47.0 kg: until 47 kg

52.0 kg: 47.01 kg – 52.00 kg

57.0 kg: 52.01 kg – 57.00 kg

63.0 kg: 57.01 kg – 63.00 kg

72.0 kg: 63.01 kg – 72.00 kg

84.0 kg: 72.01 kg – 84.00 kg

+ 84.0 kg: over 84.01 kg

Every country can send 8 men athletes, one for each weight category, and 7 women for the 7 different weight categories. In the Youth and Junior categories maximum 9 men and 8 women are accepted to attend from a country. None of the countries are allowed to send more than 2 athletes in the same weight category. At the masters championships more 3 athletes are allowed to attend, at the women in the Masters III category, at the men in the Masters IV, because they are competing only for medals, in their own age-group, judged by the Wilks Formula (it’s used to compare the strength of powerlifters against each other despite the different weights of the lifters). Every country can send maximum 5 substitutes and they have to sign them in 60 days before the competitions starts. In the signing they need to mention the athletes weight category, the best integrated results which were reached in the last 12 months on world- or international championship.